Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://bspace.buid.ac.ae/handle/1234/993
Title: EFFICACY AND DIFFERENTIATION OF INSTRUCTION FOR GIFTED STUDENTS IN A REGULAR CLASSROOM IN UAE
Authors: El Kfoury, Julie
Keywords: differentiation of instruction
regular classroom
gifted students
teacher self-efficacy
United Arab Emirates (UAE)
Issue Date: Oct-2016
Publisher: The British University in Dubai (BUiD)
Abstract: The aim of the research was to determine the relationship between efficacy and differentiation of instruction for gifted students in a mainstream classroom in UAE. Teacher self-efficacy explains the willingness of teachers to adapt instructions for gifted students in regular classrooms. Survey data from 341 teachers from primary, middle, secondary and vocational schools were analyzed by the use of multiple regression. The Efficacy Scale was used to measure efficacy among teachers. Teacher’s years of experience was used as the control variable. The stepwise regression showed a total of 20 percent of the dependent variable variance is essential in explaining the variance in differentiation instructions practices. The study showed that efficacy is the best predictor of the willingness of teachers to differentiate instructions for gifted students in the regular classroom. Though the study indicated statistically significant results for teacher self-efficacy as internal factors and predictors of the willingness of teachers to cater for the needs of gifted students in mainstream classrooms. The survey recommended that upcoming research should involve surveys asking respondents to list some both external and internal factors that can influence differentiation instructions for gifted students. This technique may be able to provide a wider view of what is considered obstacles to differentiation by teachers.
URI: http://bspace.buid.ac.ae/handle/1234/993
Appears in Collections:Dissertations for Special and Inclusive Education (SIE)

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